ET Obsessions: Finn Wolfhard in ‘It,’ All Things ‘Outlander’ and More!
Images: Starz / Warner Bros / Netflix / FX

Here at ET, we’re obsessed with a lot of things -- and these are the things that we’re most excited about this week:

Why We’re Obsessed With Finn Wolfhard in ‘It’

Pennywise the clown is back (and creepier than ever!) in It, director Andy Muschietti’s remake of the 1990 miniseries based on Stephen King's novel of the same name. Although the shape-shifting monster, portrayed by Bill Skarsgård, is the true star of the film, there's one member of The Losers' Club we can't stop talking about: Richie Tozier played by Stranger Things star Finn Wolfhard. The 14-year-old actor takes on the role of “Trashmouth” in this version, stealing every scene with his mindboggling jokes and sexual innuendos that every teenage boy can relate to -- and every adult can't help but laugh at.

“[My favorite] is the bad one that I can't say on TV,” Wolfhard tells ET. “At the end of the rock fight, I'm the only one standing. Everyone leaves and I'm just looking at Henry Bowers [Nicholas Hamilton] and say…” Well, we can’t reveal it here either!!

It is in theaters Friday, Sept. 8. 

Why We’re Obsessed With All Things ‘Outlander’

The highly anticipated third season of Outlander -- based on Diana Gabaldon's third novel in the series, Voyager -- premieres on Sept. 10, and Caitriona Balfe tells ET it feels “very different” from anything we've previously seen on the Starz drama. “I think that's the great thing about our show is every season feels very unique and it has its own unique journey within it,” she says from the Lallybroch set in Scotland, where ET was on hand to get all the season three exclusives. “It's been quite strange because Sam and I have been apart for the first bit of it.”

“They spend so much time apart,” Sam Heughan confirms. “I mean, decades apart and they've become different people, and they have lived other lives, so it's been really fun. As you've said, it's completely different, so it's not like we're doing the same show. Each season it really changes.”

Ahead of the new season, Comcast’s Xfinity TV customers who are behind -- and we’ll try not to judge -- can catch up without a subscription to Starz. Starting Sept. 4, audiences can watch as much Outlander they want ahead of the premiere.   

Outlander premieres Sunday, Sept. 10 on Starz.

Why We’re Obsessed With the Music of ‘BoJack Horseman’

Netflix’s animated series about a self-loathing horse (voiced by Will Arnett), who found fame in the ‘90s and has since struggled with relevancy and loneliness, is back for a fourth season as BoJack’s friends move on with their lives after his disappearance. While the bitter comedy continues to outshine itself with each new season, we can’t help but appreciate the show’s soundtrack, with music by Patrick Carney, Grouplove and composer Jesse Novak. For the fourth season, Carney and fiancée Michelle Branch come together on an aptly chosen cover of “A Horse With No Name.”

Why We’re Obsessed With ‘American Horror Story: Cult’

Ryan Murphy’s long-running anthology series is back with its seventh installment, Cult, that sees the series strip down to the basics of horror. On this season of American Horror Story, gone are the supernatural elements that have been long part of the show’s storytelling. Instead, what audiences get is the horrors of life following the 2016 U.S. presidential election and Purge-like terror in one Ohio town, where Sarah Paulson’s character, plagued with guilt over voting for Jill Stein, is steeped in paranoia and a fear of clowns. But rest reassured that American Horror Story’s same camp feel is still there.

The new season adds Alison Pill, Billie Lourd, Billy Eichner, Colton Haynes and Lena Dunham to the cast alongside returning favorites Paulson, Adina Porter, Cheyenne Jackson, Evan Peters and France Conroy.

American Horror Story: Cult premieres Tuesday, Sept. 5 on FX.

Why We’re Obsessed With ‘New York’ by St. Vincent

St. Vincent’s summer track, “New York,” is a mournful breakup ballad, but the accompanying video, directed by Alex Da Corte, is anything but. Full of vivid colors and dazzling backdrops, the video offers a striking contrast to the singer’s disdain for the “motherf**ker” that wronged her. “I think Annie's New York is the New York of my dreams -- one that is blurry and fractured, dreamy and flat," Da Corte said in a statement to ET. “It is the Toontown to my Hollywood. It is beautiful but slightly out of reach.”

The visual appeal of the video certainly matches the second installment of “The House of Peroni,” an annual pop-up celebrating art and creativity curated and designed by St. Vincent. The show will debut in October in New York’s SoHo neighborhood.

“New York” is out now.

--Additional writing and reporting by Ashley Crossan Desiree Murphy and Leanne Aguilera