Cindy Crawford on 'Daunting' Experience of Turning 50 and Watching Daughter Kaia Become 'It' Girl Model

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Photo: Getty Images
Cindy Crawford admits that she never saw herself as a woman in her fifties.
In an interview with Dujour magazine, the 51-year-old supermodel confesses that she initially struggled with growing older in the fashion industry, all the while watching her 15-year-old look-alike daughter, Kaia Gerber, flourish in her modeling career.
"For me it was really hard; the idea of turning 50 was daunting," she confides. "For so long I was the 20-year-old model on the cover of Vogue, or 25 or 30, and then, all of a sudden, my daughter is becoming that."
Photo: DuJour
Crawford says she now wants to portray another image of women her age. "My mother was here for Mother’s Day and I was talking to her about how I change the narrative for who I am at this age. I don’t want to spend my fifties trying to get back to where I was in my thirties," she explains. "Even though, yes, maybe I would like my skin or my waistline to be the same, I’ve worked hard and evolved into this person.”
As for daughter Kaia and 17-year-old son Presley's modeling careers, Crawford claims she never persuaded them to follow in her footsteps. "It’s certainly not something I encouraged, nor did I discourage it," she notes. "I think what I’m realizing, especially now that they’re graduating from high school, is a lot of kids end up doing what their parents do. The fact they were interested in fashion shouldn’t be totally surprising. And because they’re my kids, they have an easy point of entry."
Crawford adds that Kaia and Presley seem to have decided to go into modeling for different reasons. "For my son, I think he’s more in it for the travel -- for guys it’s different, it’s a nice finishing school for him,” she quips. “For my daughter, she’s seen what an amazing career I’ve had, and how hard I work and how seriously I take it. But she’s only 15, so we’ll see what happens."
The mother of two also notes that being a model in 2017 is quite different than the '90s. "Because of social media, you see that beauty isn’t rare. Beauty is everywhere we look -- I think that’s very empowering for women,” she says. “Before we only had a handful of women who were appearing in magazines. Now you can go on Instagram and someone you’ve never heard of, who maybe only has one follower or maybe has nine million -- you see they’re beautiful."