Mark Hamill's 'Star Wars' Sequel Jedi Mind Trick

by David Weiner 3:15 PM PST, November 28, 2012
Playing Mark Hamill's 'Star Wars' Sequel Jedi Mind Trick

Does Mark Hamill know more about the upcoming Star Wars sequels than he's leading us to believe? Will Luke Skywalker appear in Episode VII? Is the man just using a Jedi mind trick on ET?

Related: Mark Hamill Tells New Stories from 'Star Wars'

"That's a really good question! I mean, it's also exciting, but I don't really know enough to be able to answer these questions – I have to watch Entertainment Tonight to find out," said the cagey star with a smile at the Tuesday premiere of his gritty new gangster movie, Sushi Girl.

As for whether or not he think Steven Spielberg may still opt to helm an installment of his buddy George Lucas' franchise, Mark said, "Anybody that loves movies would love for Steven Spielberg to be in the director's chair, but I understand why he probably wouldn't want to. He's a trendsetter. He doesn't really follow anybody else."

Mark volunteered that up next he'd like to climb into the director's chair himself with an adaptation of The Black Pearl, and told ETonline that he's working on the project with the writers of The Fighter.

Sushi Girl, out this week on VOD, follows a group of gangsters who reunite for dinner -- fresh sushi atop a naked girl -- several years after a diamond heist gone wrong. Determined to find out where the missing diamonds are, they torture one of the members who last had the jewels in his possession. Directed by Kern Saxton, the film boasts such co-stars as Tony Todd, James Duval and Noah Hathaway and features cameos by Danny Trejo, Sonny Chiba, Michael Biehn and Jeff Fahey.

Video: Sushi Girl -- Yes, This is Mark Hamill from 'Star Wars'

So why take on such a dark tale? "Because I don't get offered these kind of bizarre roles, and I get jealous of people like Philip Seymour Hoffman and Steve Buscemi, and I had fun playing a psycho when I did Joker [for the animated Batman series], so I should do it on camera once instead of just in cartoons. … Certainly darker characters and villains are a lot of fun to play, especially when you're known for something 180-degrees removed from that."