Everyone Thinks This Colombia Cycling Team's Uniforms Makes Them Look Naked

by John Boone 1:01 PM PDT, September 15, 2014
Photo: Twitter

This is NNSFW. Not “Not Safe for Work.” Despite how it may look.

The IDRD-Bogatá Humana-San Mateo-Solgar ladies cycling team — a team backed by the Colombian Federation and sponsored by the city of Bogota — raised more than a few eyebrows when they appeared at the Giro della Toscana in Italy wearing uniforms that revealed...well, what exactly are these revealing?


At first glance, their kits (cycling outfits) appear to be a fairly conservative red and yellow design with the entire section around their midriff and crotch cut out to reveal the naked nether region below. Alas, it is just a very (very, very) unfortunately placed patch of flesh colored fabric.

The outfit has been called the “worst designed garment of clothing in the history of the human race” on social media, where the consensus seems to be: HOW COULD YOU NOT NOTICE THIS SOONER?! IT LOOKS LIKE YOUR HOO-HA IS OUT!

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Reports from Colombia (via BBC) say that one of the women on the team designed the kit herself and had it approved by all of her teammates. They’ve apparently been wearing them, unnoticed, for some nine months now.

"People in Colombia have tried to protect and stand up for the women who are being made fun of for something that wasn't intended at all,” one report says. The president of the International Cycling Union, Brian Cookson, has called it “unacceptable by any standard of decency.”

Meanwhile, website Chasing Wheel is trying to change the conversation from the team’s, uh, fashion faux pas to social injustice: “You can be outraged by an unflattering photo,” they write.

“Or you can be outraged by the fact that the people running the sport still haven’t bought forward meaningful change to ensure that women are not on the end of enduring sexism in the sport where their right to a fair wage for a professional job is still considered less important than the design of their kit.”