Sheryl Underwood Opens Up About Her Past Abuse, Gives Advice to Duggar Victims

by Raphael Chestang 4:42 PM PDT, June 05, 2015
Playing Sheryl Underwood Opens Up About Her Past Abuse, Gives Advice to Duggar Victims

Megyn Kelly's Fox News interview with the Duggars has drawn a heated reaction from a lot of people, but none more so than The Talk's Sheryl Underwood.

The comedienne knows first-hand the effects of child molestation. She told a live studio audience that she was abused as a child during a taping of The Talk on Thursday. On Friday, Underwood stopped by the ET stage to explain how she felt while watching clips from the Duggar family interview, which will air in its entirety Friday on Fox News Channel.

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"It was like the child in me screaming, 'Speak out for me!'" Underwood told ET. "I really felt like it was the younger me saying to the older me, 'You have a platform to speak to other people. Save me by saving them,'" she said.

Underwood hopes that her story helps the victims heal while giving the rest of the family a better understanding of what the girls might be going through.

"Maybe [the Duggars] need to see what this is still doing to me," Underwood said. "So [they] think [their] children don't know. [They] think [their] children don't remember and [they] think everybody is okay with and he's gone on with his life, but maybe they haven't because I haven't."

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Josh Duggar confessed to molesting five underage girls when he was a teenager. Two of those girls were his sisters Jessa Seewald and Jill Dillard. Underwood senses that the family's support of Josh through the situation may have swayed their view of what happened to them.

"I think they don't know what to feel, because they may be trying to fit in with this family dynamic and not want to go against the family," Underwood said before offering some final advice for the Duggar girls.

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"The first thing they need to get is some objective entity that comes in to talk to them without judging them," Underwood said. "What they really need to do is get off the TV. Get your family together because this camera pointed at you is a different type of stimulus. Get a regular job."