NEWS

Ali Landry's Father-in-Law and Brother-in-Law Found Dead in Mexico After Kidnapping

by Jackie Willis 10:51 AM PDT, September 24, 2015
Playing Ali Landry's Father-in-Law and Brother-in-Law Found Dead in Mexico After Kidnapping

After being kidnapped and held for ransom, the father and brother of former Miss USA Ali Landry's husband, filmmaker Alejandro Gomez Monteverde, were found dead in northern Veracruz, Mexico over the weekend.

Juan Manuel Gomez Fernandez and Juan Manuel Gomez Monteverde were reported missing on Sept. 4. The men left their home in Tampico, Tamaulipas 16 days ago and their bodies were discovered by law enforcement on Sept. 19, according to the Latin Times.

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Director Eduardo Verástegui, who was a producer on Alejandro's Little Boy film, confirmed the news to ET and tweeted his condolences upon hearing of the tragedy.

"With a heart full of pain and sadness, I ask for prayers for my friend and 'compadre' Alejandro Gomez Monteverde and all his family," Verástegui wrote. "My deepest condolences to my soul brother, I love you so much 'compadre,' I put my heart in your hands and I join you in this deep pain."

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Ali's rep also told ET that the reports were "sadly true."

Local news channel Televisa reported that the ransom was paid to the kidnappers, but the men were still found dead.

Nine months ago, Alejandro shared a sweet photo of himself and his father on Instagram. "Celebrating in San Miguel de Allende, with my best friend, my life mentor, the wisest man I know; my father," he wrote. "Tobala mezcal."

Celebrating in San Miguel de Allende, with my best friend, my life mentor, the wisest man I know; my father. Tobala mezcal

A photo posted by Alejandro Monteverde (@alejandromonteverde77) on

According to the Latin Times, Alejandro's brother was part-owner of a restaurant in Tampico that has been rumored to have had drug cartel activity there in the past. The newspaper also points out that Tamaulipas does have high crime rates that is often times credited to drug cartel members.

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