EXCLUSIVE: Alan Thicke Told Son to Snap Photo as EMTs Took Him to Hospital: 'Take a Shot, Kiddo'

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Beloved television actor Alan Thicke died at age 69 on Tuesday, ET can confirm.
The celebrated Canadian actor, best known for his role as patriarch Dr. Jason Seaver on the '80s sitcom Growing Pains, suffered a heart attack while playing hockey with his 19-year-old son, Carter, at the Pickwick Gardens ice skating rink in Burbank, California, on Tuesday afternoon. He was later pronounced dead at Providence St. Joseph's Medical Center.
ET's Lauren Zima spoke with Darin Mathewson, vice president of Pickwick Gardens, who placed the 911 call when Thicke collapsed at the rink.
"I was in my office [and] probably in the first 15 to 20 minutes of the game, these guys came running in and said, 'Hey. call 911. We got a guy down.' So I called immediately and went out there," Mathewson recalled. "In Burbank, the EMTs and the ambulance services are really fast, within a few minutes, and by the time I got out there, they were coming in."
Mathewson told ET that Thicke was initially vomiting and not feeling well but was “coherent” when emergency personnel arrived, still moving around and speaking to his son.
“He said he had pain in his chest, but his color was not good. He was a little grey,” he added. “When the ambulance got here they checked his vitals ... and they put him on the gurney, sat him up.”
According to Mathewson, Thicke also asked his son to take a photo of him as he was being taken to the hospital. "On his way out he asked his son to take a picture. He goes, 'Ah, take a shot kiddo' and he did and off they went."
"He had Carter take a picture of him, and said, 'Make sure you get the rink in the background' as they were taking him out of here," he added. "When he went by us, he gave us the thumbs up, like, 'I'm doing good guys, I'm good.'"
Mathewson said that the staff at Pickwick Gardens are “very saddened” by the news of Thicke’s death, as the lifelong hockey fan was “pretty much a regular” at the Burbank ice rink, where he skated a few times a month.
“We didn't think that was going to be the case so it's very sad news," he said. “I felt bad for Carter, I could see he was very shaken up by the whole thing.”
Like the rest of Thicke’s family, friends and fans, the Pickwick Gardens staff have only happy memories of the celebrated actor.
“He always had a good one-liner after everything,” Mathewson added. “Funny, good, good guy -- good man. We're just going to miss him so much.”

Additional reporting by Steve Wilks.