EXCLUSIVE: Jim Parsons Dishes on Sheldon's 'Big Bang Theory' Spinoff and Diving Into Political Radio

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In the same way that Jim Parsons doesn't have to be a real-life physicist to play one on The Big Bang Theory, the actor is now taking on politics despite his lack of expertise in government.
In a six-week radio series called Jim Parsons Is Too Stupid for Politics, the Emmy winner and his listeners will learn about the current political climate with the help of some Washington insiders.
"I'm scared to death. Are you kidding me? It's live!" Parsons admitted to ET during a sit-down at the SiriusXM studio in New York City. "But it is what it is. Look, it's the other reason the word 'stupid' is built into the title. I've built myself in a good excuse. You can't call me out on it. I already told you."
But don't let the title fool you. Parsons told us he's been doing some serious studying on matters of state for the one-hour weekly talk show, premiering Friday on Andy Cohen's SiriusXM channel, Radio Andy.
"My biggest desire is to try and talk about things that are going on in government and the country from a neutral point of view -- from a fact-based point of view," Parsons said.
And while he's just getting his footing with his new job, Parsons couldn't have a better boss.
"So far, Andy's been a hands-off and a very kind boss," he said.
Big Bang Theory fans will be glad to know that Parsons' new gig won't get in the way of his hit CBS sitcom. In fact, Parsons is helping bring even more of Sheldon to television by executive producing a Big Bang spinoff about the lovable nerd character as a teenager.
The role will require a new face, and Parsons had some advice for whomever gets cast.
"I would advise that actor to watch me as little as possible, and take that thing by the horns, and make it your own," he said.
On the show, fans will get to see Sheldon's formative years of growing up in a colorful family in Texas.
According to Parsons, the idea to do a spinoff on his character was almost a no-brainer.
"[The writers] have done, from the beginning, such a good job of building such a history and a layered nature to all these characters," he said. "It just seems like a really wasted opportunity if you don't decide to explore the origin story with that. I mean, they've layered so many things in there over the past decade that is already there to be drawn from. I 'm really excited about it. I think it will be very different than Big Bang, but in a good way."  Reporting by Rande Iaboni