Jon Hamm Gets Candid About His 'Really Hard' Split From Jennifer Westfeldt, Says Being Single 'Sucks'

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InStyle
Jon Hamm is having a "really hard" time as a bachelor.
Ever since splitting from his girlfriend of 18 years, Jennifer Westfeldt, in 2015, the Mad Men star hasn't been in the greatest of moods.
In a candid interview with InStyle, Hamm admits that being single "sucks."
"It's fine," the 46-year-old actor explains. "It's hard. It's hard to be single after being together for a long time. It's really hard. It sucks."
InStyle
The St. Louis, Missouri, native also confesses that in addition to being somewhat of a hopeless romantic, he's also quite the softie when it comes to enjoying Broadway plays or dance performances.
"I'm just blown away by the beauty of it all," he says. "Especially when I see anybody performing at the peak of their ability. I see it, and I f**king weep."
As ET previously reported, Hamm and Westfeldt, 47, issued a joint statement when they called it quits in September 2015, shortly after the actor's brief stint in rehab for alcohol abuse.
"With great sadness, we have decided to separate, after 18 years of love and shared history," the statement read. "We will continue to be supportive of each other in every way possible moving forward."
At the time, a source told ET that the breakup occurred a few months before the two announced the news, and that it was due in part to Hamm's "party-heavy lifestyle."
"Jon and Jennifer really fought hard to make their relationship work, Jennifer more so than Jon," the source claimed. "They were together for many years, but in the end, it was too much work. It's no secret that Jon likes to go out and leads a very party-heavy lifestyle. And Jennifer was just tired of that."
"She wanted him to grow up … and he never wanted to," the source added. "She was tired of being his mother."
InStyle
In his latest interview with InStyle, he touched on what it was like going to therapy as a public figure.
"Medical attention is medical attention whether it's for your elbow or for your teeth or for your brain," he explains. "And it's important. We live in a world where to admit anything negative about yourself is seen as a weakness, when it's actually a strength."
"It's not a weak move to say, 'I need help,'" he continues. "In the long run it's way better, because you have to fix it."
Hear more in the video below.