EXCLUSIVE: Evelyn Lozada Talks Reuniting With Jennifer Williams On 'Unpredictable' Season Of 'Basketball Wives

By
Photo: Getty Images
Evelyn Lozada wants fans to know that it's ok to say "sorry."
On last week's episode of Basketball Wives, viewers watched as Lozada and her former best friend, Jennifer Williams officially hashed out their differences.
The scene was five years in the making, for the ex-besties whose friendship imploded over a blog post that led to a tense fallout in season four.
After taking a break from the franchise, Lozada signed on to return to the VH1 reality show, which airs Mondays at 9 p.m. ET/PT, for season six. She also heard a "rumor" that Williams would be coming back to the show, and agreed to an on-camera meeting, under one condition.
"I've known Jen since I was about 24, so when there were rumors that she was possibly coming back, I [ reminded producers] that I have real history with this person," Lozada dished to ET during a phone interview from her home in Arizona on Thursday. "If I'm going to film a scene with her, I wanted it to be just the two of us." The onetime bff's met up on a beach in Malibu, California, that turned into an emotional apology.
"We didn't want anyone else to be there because the issues that we had were between the both of us,"Lozada said. "No one else really matters."
But that doesn’t mean she wasn't worried about how things would play out.
"We didn't have a conversation prior to [filming], so I was obviously very nervous," Lozada confessed. "I didn't know how it was going to turn out. I didn't know what mindset she was in, but I’m saying to myself 'I don't want to argue or fight with anybody. I definitely didn’t want any drama with her.'"
"One of the reasons why I wanted to come back to Basketball Wives was to be able to film stories like the one with [Williams]," she continued. "Real things that people can relate to, other than catty drama."
She also wants to show that she and Williams ultimately have a strong "sisterhood," and set an example for other women.
"We're sisters, you can go through things," she said. "But you can also be two grown adults and work through it. I think it’s okay to say 'I'm sorry, I f***d up.'"
Now that the friendship is on the mend, Lozada and Williams have been texting "once or twice" a week.
"We're working on getting things back to 100 percent, but I will say that we're well on our way," Lozada noted before admitting that she felt "sad" about how her friendship with Williams ended.
"I'm at a point in my life where -- especially after having my son and taking a break [from the show after season five] -- sometimes you need to take pause," she shared.
"There's so much conflict and craziness going on in your life sometimes it's good to take a pause. During that period, you think about friends and relationships [and] where did things go wrong."
Although Lozada hasn't exactly dodged the drama this season, she hopes to show fans that "you can change and be a better person."
"I'm not saying change to the point where you’re not the same person at all, but to be able to grow," she clarified.
"It was definitely the hardest season for me. I wanted to show that I'm different. I'm not coming to argue, but everybody didn’t get the memo," Lozada joked, in reference to her rift with cast member Jackie Christie.
"You never know what's going to happen, who's going to dig up something up just to have a moment on the show," she pointed out. "You're always on guard." Yet no matter how "unpredictable" the show may get, Lozada plans to return for another season, and she wouldn't mind having her own show.
"Reality TV has worked for me and I know what comes with it," she noted. "I would love to have my own show again obviously, I've had my own show [Living Lozada]. I was so thankful for that opportunity so yeah, if someone else offered me my own show I would be open to it."
Outside of the reality world, the Bronx, New York, native has been busy focusing on the Evelyn Lozada Foundation, her new charity for survivors of domestic violence.
"That's my number one priority right now," she shared. "I want to really be able to help as many woman and even men as I can to get out of abusive relationships."
Following her own experience with domestic violence, Lozada was inspired to help other women, especially those who may not have the financial means to get out of an abusive relationship.
"I know so many women don't have that, they don’t really have resources," she said. "So I want to be able to help as many women as I can."