Selma Blair Says She 'Stopped Looking in the Mirror' After MS Treatments: 'Didn't Miss It'

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Selma Blair is getting real about how her views on beauty and makeup have changed in the wake of her multiple sclerosis diagnosis in 2018. In a new interview with InStyle, Blair opened up about how her approach to life has changed and what inspired her to find a beauty brand of her own.

"After I had treatment, I'd honestly, like, stopped looking in the mirror," Blair said. "My hair was short, I was bloated, I had alopecia on my lashes and my face. And it was all so much effort — I sometimes don't see well — so I just stopped, and I didn't think I missed it."

While she may have stopped looking in the mirror, Blair told the magazine that she's never viewed makeup or self-care as "frivolous." 

"I've never thought of fashion, makeup — really, any of our ways of self-care and presenting ourselves — as frivolous," she said, before discussing the turning point that has been founding Guide Beauty.

"It was a real turning point for me," Blair said of discovering the brand, which features beauty products that actually guide your hand to better and easier application. "It was like, 'OK, let's start waking up again.'"

When it comes to creating the inclusive line, Blair said she wanted to create a world in which everyone could play with makeup together.

"You're not designing for an 'us' or a 'them,'" she explained. "You're just looking to design for that beautiful 'we' moment: When we all get to play in the same world together with makeup."

Blair discussed her MS diagnosis in greater detail in her 2021 documentary, Introducing, Selma Blair. Chronicling the ups and downs of her undergoing HSCT, a bone marrow stem cell transplant and more. Blair spoke to ET following the documentary's release about shaving her head, and how her overall mindset has changed in the last several years.

"It was to have him be a part of it, help him be in control of maybe like a first image of Mom looking different," Blair explained. "That was pretty easy and a nice moment, and it makes me feel better knowing Arthur has a say -- not a say, really, but is included."

She added that Arthur has already forgotten the conversation surrounding shaving his mom's head, which took place years ago. "There is so much I realize he was really young he didn't remember," Blair shared. 

Due in part to her diagnosis and the journey she's undergone, the Cruel Intentions actress said that her mindset has changed after years of considering herself "cynical" and a "realist." 

"I did not cultivate a real lightness in myself of long-term stamina, how to be more of a cheerleader instead of a just an empathizer with people that were already down," she explained. "So now I have some voices and, kind of, cheerleading to do for myself and others because I do think we are meant to have joy, and [it's] the only way people will move forward and get through fear and things that divide us."

For more on Blair, check out the video below.

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