Black-Owned Health and Wellness Businesses to Support Now and Always

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black owned health wellness businesses
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Companies around the world have navigated to new ways of serving their customers due to social distancing mandates and other safety protocols brought on by the coronavirus pandemic -- and after nearly a year of unprecedented changes, owning a business looks entirely different than it did before. But for Black business owners, everything that comes with keeping a business afloat -- not to mention the stress of day-to-day life -- has been compounded by the outcry from last summer against police brutality, racial injustice and systemic issues following the tragic deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor along with too many others. While the past year has no doubt shone a light on the importance of supporting Black businesses, Black History Month (which starts this February) adds a new layer, showcasing Black history, its culture, and its impact on America. And as you continue to educate yourself in the Black history and how it intertwines with that of America, you can also show your support for Black business owners by working with or shopping from Black-owned companies whenever possible. 

Of course, there are plenty of Black-owned companies in the fashion and beauty industries. But with so many people focused on self-care and their personal well-being during this time of staying at home, the popularity of the wellness and health space is on the rise. Luckily, this space is full of brands that are founded and run by Black women and men. Whether they're selling aromatherapy candles, producing fitness-minded podcasts or shattering stigmas of what it means to be "well" for Black women, each of these companies was once just a dream and is now a hard-earned reality. 

But don't just shop these Black-owned businesses today or during Black History Month. Support them regularly, engage with them on social media (you'll be surprised at the impact your likes, follows, and comments can make!) and spread the word to your friends, family and peers. Then seek out other minority-owned companies -- apps like Black Nation and Official Black Wall Street make this easy -- and repeat. (In addition to committing to discovering and supporting Black-owned businesses, you can also donate to causes that move you, educate yourself through reliable sources and simply make your voice heard.)

Below, meet some of the Black-owned health and wellness companies we support and the inspiring women and men behind them.

Postal Petals

Business in bloom! Los Angeles–based Talia Boone used the early days of the pandemic to launch a completely genius farm-to-table flower delivery platform. Postal Petals works much like a produce delivery service, shipping handpicked boxes of fresh, seasonal flowers and greenery that you can arrange -- or learn to arrange -- to perfectly suit your home and style preferences. Boxes come in three sizes and include six to 15 bundles of fresh flowers from carefully chosen farm partners, as well as care and design tips. (You can also seek out ideas on Postal Petals' Instagram feed.) Find calmness in arranging the flowers solo or grab up to five friends and book a Petal Party virtual workshop, where you'll all design your own masterpieces from the same bundles.

Want to send a loved one a sweet little something? Postal Petals makes it easy with its ready-to-ship arrangements.
$89 AT POSTAL PETALS

Grounded Plants

Plants as therapy? Grounded Plants cofounders Mignon Hemsley and Danuelle Doswell say yes. Their brand new online shop is packed with varieties like golden pothos and aloe vera to help you decompress and disconnect, resulting in a healthier and happier you. (Also, their three-month subscription service is simply genius.) Check for restocks soon. 

For the green thumbs out there, this little cactus will be a cute, livening piece to add to your home.
$25 AT GROUNDED PLANTS

Boombox Boxing Club

Reggie "Jefe" Smith and Angela "AJ Boomin" Jennings founded Washington, DC-based Boombox Boxing Club as a way to offer both boxing-inspired group fitness classes and a strong, teamwork-minded community. Boombox is navigating the coronavirus pandemic with $10 virtual classes that anyone can join -- and continuing their mission of making boxing-inspired training accessible to all.

Boombox Boxing Club Jab Tank
Boombox Boxing Club
Ready to break a sweat? Get in the mood with this boxing-themed tank top from Boombox Boxing Club.
$50 AT BOOMBOX BOXING CLUB

Naaya

Sinikiwe Dhliwayo founded Naaya with the purpose of redefining "wellness" into a term that centers on Black, indigenous and people of color (BIPOC). Her video on why we need to have difficult conversations is a must-watch.

If you're eager to be enlightened, Naaya offers Talk: Power Dynamics with experts like Layla F. Saad, the author of Me and White Supremacy to share their experiences as Black women.
$25 AT NAAYA

Transparent Black Girl

Writer Yasmine Jameelah created this wellness collective by curating digital content, a Transparent Talk series, apparel and more. Jameelah says, "I believe that wellness like people of color is multifaceted and it should be free to take on as many forms as it sees fit. Here, we embrace it all."

Show your support for Transparent Black Girl's parent organization Transparent & Black with this simple statement tee.
$30 AT TRANSPARENT & BLACK

Balanced Black Girl

This uplifting podcast, book club and supportive wellness community for women of color was founded by Lestraundra “Les” Alfred, a fitness trainer and nutrition coach.

Want more guidance for your wellness journey? Opt for a community membership to Balanced Black Girl, which will give you resources and connect you to others also working towards greater wellness.
$47 AT BALANCED BLACK GIRL

PUR Home

Angela Richardson isn't just PUR Home's founder and CEO -- she is also the formulator and product developer for the company's line of natural household and skincare products. From organic castile soap to lavender-grapefruit laundry detergent to waterless all-purpose bar soap, PUR Home's products are proudly plant-based, biodegradable and low toxic.

Look, there's no reason you shouldn't have more hand sanitizer on you. And this medical-grade, FDA-approved and registered option features vitamin E, emollients and moisturizers to keep your hands from feeling too dry.
$8 AT PUR HOME

Golde

Trinity Mouzon Wofford is the powerhouse behind Golde, a Brooklyn-based vegan company that makes superfood-boosted wellness and beauty essentials. Their latte blends and face masks are filled with ingredients like turmeric, matcha and spirulina, and their Instagram feed is filled with recipes, tips and inspo.

Want an energy boost without the jitters of caffeine? Make yourself a drink with Golde's Matcha Tumeric Latte Blend.
$29 AT GOLDE

Love Notes LLC

Founded by Brooklyn-based Nya Kam, Love Notes hand-pours custom blended aromatherapy candles in heavenly scent combos like lemon verbena-ginger-mint and black amber-lavender-pear. Love Notes also sells Self-ish body teas, for those seeking an extra-luxurious bathing and soaking experience. 

With notes of lemon verbana, ginger and mint, this will be the essential candle to add new life to your home. Plus, when you've burned through the candle, you can reuse the glass container for something else.
$32 AT LOVE NOTES

BLK+GRN

BLK+GRN is all about community. The company's website is an all-natural marketplace that connects Black people with high-quality, toxic-free brands like Dirt Don't Hurt (pictured above), and the weekly BLK+GRN podcast spotlights Black female artisans, their stories and their products.

Put yourself in the zone for a calm evening with an organic, fizzy bath bomb.
$7 AT BLK + GRN

The Honey Pot

What does it mean to be the first plant-based feminine care system on the market? For Honey Pot CEO Bea Dixon, it's personal -- she suffered from bacterial vaginosis for months before starting her herb-powered line of products to cleanse, protect and balance the vagina.

Looking for an intimate cleanser? This sensitive option from The Honey Pot will balance your pH level to boost moisture and soothe your most intimate area.
$10 AT THE HONEY POT

Muniq

Muniq is a line of science-based nutritional shakes that feed your gut with natural prebiotic resistant starch fibers to promote a healthy gut microbiome, help manage blood sugar and strengthen immunity, among other health benefits. The shakes were formulated with the diabetic community in mind but are a match for anyone wanting to improve their health from the inside out -- there's even a vegan chocolate option. CEO Marc Washington founded Muniq in honor of his later sister, Monica, as a nutrition solution that would have empowered her to take greater control of her health.

Maintaining a plant-based diet comes easy with Muniq's vegan shake mix. Mix this in with water or your favorite type of milk and you're set to go!
$99 AT MUNIQ (REGULARLY $150)

Looking for more Black-owned businesses to support? Be sure to shop from Black-owned fashion and beauty brands, as well as shop wellness products from Oprah's Favorite Things of 2020 list, which is entirely made up of Black-owned brands, below.

Between the supportive waistband and the moisture-wicking material, these are about to be your new favorite leggings.
$45 AT AMAZON

Whether you use this during your regular workout sessions or wear it to indulge in your full skincare routine, this affordable turbanette adds a stylish touch to your routine.
$19 AT AMAZON

Need some daily inspiration? Carry Rayo and Honey's motivational tote bag everywhere you go.
$65 AT AMAZON

For the latest content celebrating Black History Month, please visit our Black History Month page, or read more in our Black Stories section. And don’t miss our Black History Month special on ET Live. 

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