Cast of Netflix's 'Made in Mexico' Says Show Will Break Down Stereotypes (Exclusive)

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Netflix is shining a spotlight on Mexico's elite in its new reality show, Made in Mexico, but according to the cast, fans will see much more than the glitz, glamour and drama of the country's upper class. 

ET's Denny Directo sat down with Kitzia Mitre, Columba Diaz and Roby Checa, at our Burbank studio, where they opened up about why Made in Mexico will help break down cultural and racial barriers between their country and the United States.

"It’s more about the human side of things. I think it goes beyond social levels, beyond skin color. It doesn’t have anything to do with that. It’s more about human real human issues and how we deal with them," Mitre, a fashion designer currently getting her Master's in Humanities, explained. Diaz noted that the show is about displaying different perspectives. 

"[We're] showing Mexico through the eyes of nine different people," Diaz said. "[It's] people who love Mexico, and it's actually showing the way nine people live, because we all have different lives and different situations, and we react differently to everything." 

Within the first few minutes of the first episode, a reference to President Donald Trump is mentioned, but according to Mitre, she and her castmates aren't scared of political commentary. 

"I think it actually is gonna break down walls," Mitre said in an obvious reference to the wall between the U.S. and Mexico Trump has openly advocated for since his 2016 campaign. "You’re gonna connect on a human level with another country, and you’re gonna see that we’re not that different."

"Also, it’s not like we’re not all rapists!" she said, alluding to Trump's 2015 speech announcing his presidential run. "We're not all serial killers... that's just absurd." 

"I think [the show] is giving the real view of Mexico, with Mexicans," Diaz declared. "Sometimes people don't really know how Mexico is, or what Mexicans are really like." 

The 24-year-old model said she's gotten questions from people asking if they have microwaves or swimming pools in Mexico, and hopes that through the show, fans will see that Mexico is full of "culture, color, traditions, food, everything." "We're all humans, it doesn't matter where you come from." 

Checa, Mitre's brother-in-law, added that his family came to Mexico from Lebanon. "People have to see not only Mexico as a bunch of immigrants than only come to the States," he said. 

The diversity within Mexico will be featured on the show, as well as the country's ability to come together after experiencing a massively deadly earthquake last year. "For me, the earthquake was an amazing time in my life, because I realized that I'm nothing without everybody else. Like, I need you, you need me, I need him and I  need her. If we support each other, we're unstoppable," Diaz declared. 

"You need to give love to everyone. You don't know what people [are] going through, and in the earthquake, everybody in Mexico, you would walk on the streets, and they would smile to you, they would let you cross the street. People forgot about it," Diaz added.

"The people saved each other," Mitre noted. 

That's what Made in Mexico is all about. "It has a lot of heart, and people in the show, we just give it everything," added Checa. "For me the most important part is someone else watching it could identify [with] my journey." 

Made in Mexico is now streaming on Netflix. 

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