Demi Lovato Was 'Stressed Out,' 'Overworked' Prior to Apparent Overdose, Source Says (Exclusive)

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Demi Lovato was seriously struggling ahead of her hospitalization.

The “Tell Me You Love Me” singer was hospitalized on Tuesday for an apparent drug overdose but prior to that, a source tells ET that Lovato’s downward spiral started in the spring.

"She pushed away everyone that tried to call her out or help her including sober coaches, friends and management," the source says. "The trouble is that Demi has been more successful than ever, and everyone wants a piece. It becomes this perfect storm. She pushed away all the people who are there to protect."

The GRAMMY nominee, who was on her Tell Me You Love Me world tour when she originally relapsed after six years of sobriety, was dealing with the pressures of a demanding schedule.

"The more stressed out and more she was overworked, the more she wants to escape and do the drugs and not stay sober,” the source adds. “No one was looking out for Demi’s best interests anymore. She pushed away everyone."

The source says that Lovato was working on another album and was also documenting her life for a follow up to her YouTube documentary, Simply Complicated.

ET reached out to Lovato's management team for comment. “Demi is awake and with her family who want to express thanks to everyone for the love, prayers, and support," her rep said in a statement on Tuesday. "Some of the information being reported is incorrect and they respectfully ask for privacy and not speculation as her health and recovery is the most important thing right now.”

Another source previously told ET that Lovato’s family is eager to get the 25-year-old pop star to rehab as soon as possible. Here's more on what the next may be for Lovato:

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